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Kansas Golf Associaition

Class of 2002


Wallace "Wally" Beets
Club Professional

When it came to career moves, Wally Beets saved his best for last. When Beets arrived at Salina Country Club in 1955, he was looking for a place that he, his wife Joy and their two young sons could call home for some time.

The Kansas Golf Foundation's selection of Beets for induction into the Kansas Golf Hall of Fame this year is an honor well deserved, according to the people that know Beets best. It is not an honor, however, that Beets could foresee coming his way when he got his start in the sport as a caddie at age 14.  Beets spent more than 40 years working as an assistant or head golf professional at courses around Kansas, including the final 33 at Salina Country Club before retiring in 1988.He got his first taste for the sport he would grow to love back in the mid 1930s, carrying clubs at the former Meadowlark Golf Course in Wichita and earning 75 cents a round, considered good money for a young man during The Depression era.  "It was hard to find jobs and was a fun way to make some money," Beets said. "I kind of liked it and noticed that the pro there got to dress pretty nice, so I thought this might be a good way to make a living."

After graduating from Wichita East High School in 1942, Beets spent three years in the U.S. Air Force and was stationed in Italy during World War II. After leaving the service, he returned to the golf course, taking positions at Meadowlark and later Wichita Country Club, where he worked under head pro Mike Murra, another Kansas Hall of Fame member. Beets had actually applied for the club pro job in Salina in 1953, but the position at that time was filled by Ted Gwyn. When Gwyn left two years later, Beets had two years of experience as head pro at Manhattan Country Club to his credit, and came with some fairly glowing recommendations. "We didn't know Wally all that well when he applied here," said Howard Engleman, president of the SCC board when Beets was hired. "He came from Manhattan at the time and everybody, including the college president (K-State's James McCain), gave him a high recommendation. I remember we didn't have a whole lot of applicants, but after the interview and playing golf with Wally, we were very impressed with his personality and his golfing abilities."  Among Beets' accomplishments in his SCC tenure was helping establish the men's City Medal and City Four Ball tournaments. To this day, those tournaments remain among the top golf events open to Saline County individuals. At the time Salina was home to only two courses - Beets' own SCC course and the Elks Country Club - with the Salina Municipal course built in 1970. Wally felt it important to promote golf, not only to Salina Country Club members, but to any men or women who might have an interest in the sport. "If you are going to be any good at all as a club pro, you've got to help promote golf, not only in the city but the whole state and nationally if you can," Beets said.

One of Wally's early pupils was former Salinan Bryan Norton, considered to be one of the best golfers to ever come out of north central Kansas. Norton, whose career included stops on both the PGA and European tours, regained his Amateur status in 1998 and recently won his second Kansas Amateur title at Tallgrass Country Club. While Norton has fond memories of growing up and learning the game of golf at Salina Country Club, Beets recalls the days when Norton "was a little kid barely big enough to drag his golf bag around," and would try to sneak on the course on Saturday afternoons when children were not allowed to play without permission from the club pro. "What I remember about Wally is his character," Norton said. "He was very enthusiastic and the consummate club professional. He was a pretty good player, got along with everybody and as a kid, I respected him. He was one of those larger than life guys that made golf fun, and as a kid, that's what gets you out there playing."

Much like Beets, Randy Syring's career choice was based in large part on the respect he developed for the club pro at SCC. Syring started working for Beets on a part-time basis in the early 1970s and continued through his high school days at Salina South and later Marymount College. Beets helped develop not only Syring's golf game, but the skills that would eventually make him a well-respected club pro himself. When Beets retired in 1988, Syring was named as his replacement and has held the position ever since.

Nearly everyone agrees that Wally had many talents as a club professional, some of which had nothing to do with his ability to strike a golf ball or sink a putt. Beets still feels one of the most important aspects of his job was to make sure everyone was happy, and that was something Syring picked up early in his career as well. "As a club pro, if you have a membership of 700, you have 700 bosses," Beets said. "The main idea is to take care of everybody. Members come out to the club for some relaxation, and part of my job was to make sure they were happy and enjoyed themselves when they came here."

"I think one of his greatest strengths as a golf professional was his rapport with the members," Syring said. "He taught me a lot about how to get along with every personality. I couldn't have had a better mentor and teacher than Wally."

Upon his retirement as club professional in 1988, a large party was held in his honor and friends put together an all-expenses paid trip for Wally and Joy to England that summer, where the couple attended the British Open at Royal Lytham and St. Annes Golf Club north of Liverpool. That was just one indication that retirement would not keep Beets away from the sport he loved. He still works at SCC on a part time basis, helping keep the club's golf cart fleet in shape. He plays golf two or three times a week and occasionally helps his son Rick, manager of The Golf Shop in Salina. "I wanted him to be around after he retired," Syring said. "Somebody who has been at the club that long and is that good at what he does is great for consultation. I'd bounce things off of him and would ask for his advice periodically and I still do."

"I'm just trying to keep my finger in golf and trying to stay out of their hair," Beets said with a smile.  The Wally Beets Invitational, held each summer at the SCC course, is another testament to the respect the people of Salina hold for the longtime club pro.
Beets acknowledges his selection to the Kansas Golf Hall of Fame is certainly one of the highlights of his golf career, and having friends and family with him at the induction ceremonies at SCC will make it even more special. Beets asked Syring, his good friend and the man who nominated him for the award, to present him at the induction ceremonies.

"It really is a heck of an honor to be inducted into the Kansas Golf Hall of Fame," Beets said. "It's like professional athletes being named to the National Football or National Baseball Hall of Fame. There are just not that many people that have received the honor and it really means quite a bit." "As I went through the nomination process and started going through the material, I became much more aware of how deserving he was of this honor," Syring said. "It's hard to put an entire career like that in perspective until you look through the material and see everything he was involved in.  It is really the perfect culmination of Wally’s career in golf.”

Mr. Beets passed away in November 2004 at the age of 81. return to Hall of Fame


Russell "Rusty" Hilst
Golf Coach & Contributor to the Game


When Rusty Hilst checked a book on golf out of the library when he was 14-years old, he never imagined his association with the game he grew to love would be recognized and honored.   From
Rusty Hilstthe time Hilst first purchased a used set of clubs, it was obvious he had been bitten by the "golf bug."

Hilst is well known as Hutchinson's ambassador of golf throughout a 45-year association with the game. His accomplishments came first as a player, secondly as a high school coach and finally as a contributor to the game at Prairie Dunes Country Club and in a 26-year association with the Kansas Golf Association.

His ability to work with youngsters and administrators in every facet of the game gave Hilst a wide range of experience that worked perfectly with his friendly demeanor and dry wit.
The 59-year-old Hilst started playing golf at the age of 14 and was tutored by longtime Carey Park Golf Course professional Harold Hoffman. Hilst believes Hoffman's positive encouragement led him down the path he chose.

His first major accomplishment came as a player when he sank the winning putt that clinched the 1960 high school state title for Hutchinson High.  Hilst later captured seven Prairie Dunes club championships and five Hutchinson City match-play championships. He holds the unofficial course record at Carey Park Golf Course with a 60.

One of his true loves came from coaching Hutchinson High's golf team for 31 years from 1971 to 2001. Hutchinson captured high school state titles in 1974 and 1995 and counted 13 top three finishes during that span.

Hutchinson's varsity players were properly prepared for competition mentally and physically by Hilst. But Hilst spent time with every player, realizing there are lifelong lessons to be learned from golf.

No better example was provided by Hilst himself. When he determined that a scoring error had been made by one of his players at a state tournament, the subsequent disqualification cost Hutchinson High a state championship. The integrity of the game was upheld.

His contribution to the game expanded another notch when was accepted as a member at nationally-respected Prairie Dunes Country Club, where he is still currently a longtime member. Hilst has contributed behind the scenes or in the forefront of virtually every collegiate, state and national championship contested at Prairie Dunes.

Hilst was a co-chair of the scoring services committee of the 2002 U.S. Women's Open. The committee was responsible for scoring, greens reporters, communications, leaderboards, NBC spotters, standard bearers, walking scorers and scorecard copying.

He has been a fixture in various capacities for the Kansas Golf Association since 1976. He has composed scoreboards and scorecards. He has marked the course and located pin placements in a fair and even-handed manner. He has answered rules questions. His honest and calm approach with youngsters employed the diplomacy of a politician.

He has worked with three Kansas Golf Association executive directors and also engaged with a host of USGA and other national events across the country.
Hilst considered his knowledge of the game, its traditions and rules to be a constant learning experience. For those contributions in varying capacities, Russell “Rusty” Hilst is duly honored as a member of the Kansas Golf Hall of Fame. return to Hall of Fame